RICCARDO BENASSI
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Study for Repetititititive Space
2010

Synthetic felt, sound loop on hidden endless tape 33''
Environmental dimensions

"[…] I’m not completely satisfied with all the other interfaces that pretended to be interactive, yet in the end, only regulated my perception of time (and I’m not just talking about traffic lights). Or perhaps I simply want to rid myself of the inertia inherited from the world of objects, and from the vivid mobility of their recent virtualization. […] I called my new interface Repetititititive Space, but have gone on to give it another suitable title to each specific incarnation of it, as well as adding texts, posters, storyboard images, collective seating, sculptural installations, and so on. […] My personal experience has helped me envision the Repetititititive Space, but now only yours will be able to keep it alive. […] More people will be here and more will be easy to discuss […] to define its essence. Could we stop to blame quantitative excess as lack of intensity? One might say that any quantitative excess is partial, and every political methodology that tries to organize this excess is based on a conscious desire: to forget those who are not present. For this reason, it is fundamental to re-establish the phenomenological nature of human co-existence within a certain space at a certain time, in order to define a common desire, and paradoxically, it will be fine by everyone because there will always be someone absent. To call a Repetititititive Space a sound installation means overlooking its inherent capacity to be a meeting ground […] Every Repetititititive Space is an attempt to highlight the friction generated when an act of life (like us) enters a somnolent sentence (architecture as a simple aggregation of past) […]"

from The Eternally Living Flame
© Riccardo Benassi, 2011

Instead of operate in the usual exhibition space of Pastificio Cerere Foundation, the work had been installed under the white cube, in a cellar-like environment – pointing out the industrial recent past of the hosting space – and under-lighting a decisive switch in the architectural functions: from spaces for production to display spaces.